by Hypsilon, Tallinn

First transgender police chief in Latin America

 In Argentina, a trans woman by the name of Analia Pasantino (49), with 20 years of experience the police force, became the first trans police chief in Latin America.


 Analia was an honoured police spokesperson and lead an anti-narcotics team until she came out as trans in 2008. Regardless of her many achievements in the federal police force, she was made to leave the force. The psychiatrists called her transsexuality as an “irreconcilable” condition and an illness. She went through psychiatric evaluation every three months, hoping that she would get back on the force, but the leave was extended every time. She told Associated Press: “It was always seen as an illness. As crude as it sounds, the final diagnosis was: a disturbance in gender identity that made me unrecoverable to the police force.”


 She got back to the force, as a deputy police commissioner in the judicial communications department, after a change in leadership this week. “This is a milestone. I’m the first transgender police chief in Latin America. It’s an unprecedented and important step to show Latin America and the world that we are an open institution,” she said in a comment to the reacceptance.


 Before she came out as trans, Pasantino dressed as a woman while living with her wife, Silvia Mauro. Pasantino told that her wife has been her pillar of support and she has backed her with everything, even being her lawyer.  Silvia and Pasantiono have been together for 31 years. The world has changed,” said Pasantino, “You can live a life of gender identity and it’s no longer necessary to live a double life.”


 Even though Argentina has been one of the big supporters of LGBT rights in the past years, in 2008 things were different. Things changed in 2010, when Argentina approved gay marriages and, in 2012, approved transgender as an official gender. Also, in 2015, they approved gay and bi men to donate blood without restrictions.

13 May, 2017